Tag Archive | JAFF

My Latest P&P Variation, When Jane Got Angry, is Now Available!

My latest Pride and Prejudice variation, When Jane Got Angry, is here!  It’s now available on Amazon, Smashwords, BN.com, Kobo, iTunes and other sites.  The paperback is available on Amazon.

The story focuses on Jane and Bingley–with a little Darcy and Elizabeth thrown in.  Check out the blurb below!

When Mr. Bingley abruptly left Hertfordshire, Jane Bennet’s heart was broken.  Since arriving in London to visit her aunt and uncle, Jane has been hoping to encounter Mr. Bingley; however, it becomes clear that his sister is keeping them apart. 

But what would happen if she took matters into her own hands?  Defying social convention, she sets out to alert Mr. Bingley to her presence in London, hoping to rekindle the sparks of their relationship.

Bingley is thrilled to encounter Jane and renew their acquaintance, but his sister has told him several lies about the Bennets—and his best friend, Mr. Darcy, still opposes any relationship.  As Jane and Bingley sort through this web of deceit, they both find it difficult to maintain their customary equanimity. 

However, they also discover that sometimes good things happen when Jane gets angry. 

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Christmas at Darcy House Now Available at Amazon!

My latest Pride and Prejudice Variation, Christmas at Darcy House, is now available at Amazon!  Here is the blurb:

A Pride and Prejudice Variation.  Mr. Darcy hopes Christmastime will help him to forget the pair of fine eyes that he left behind in Hertfordshire.  When Elizabeth Bennet appears unexpectedly in London, Darcy decides to keep his distance, resolved to withstand his attraction to her.  But when he learns that Wickham is threatening to propose to Elizabeth, Darcy faces a crisis.

For her part, Elizabeth does not understand why the unpleasant master of Pemberley insists on dancing with her at the Christmas ball or how his eyes happen to seek her out so often.  She enjoys Mr. Wickham’s company and is flattered when he makes her an offer of marriage.  On the other hand, Mr. Darcy’s proposal is unexpected and unwelcome.  But the more Elizabeth learns of Mr. Darcy, the more confused she becomes—as she prepares to make the most momentous decision of her life.

It’s a Yuletide season of love and passion as your favorite characters enjoy Christmas at Darcy House!

 

My New Novel, Darcy’s Honor, is Live on Amazon!

Here is the link:  https://www.amazon.com/Darcys-Honor-Pride-Prejudice-Variation-ebook/dp/B06Y13ZLV9/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492087673&sr=8-1&keywords=victoria+kincaid

And here is the synopsis:  Elizabeth Bennet is relieved when the difficult Mr. Darcy leaves the area after the Netherfield Ball. But she soon runs afoul of Lord Henry, a Viscount who thinks to force her into marrying him by slandering her name and ruining her reputation.  An outcast in Meryton, and even within her own family, Elizabeth has nobody to turn to and nowhere to go.

Darcy successfully resisted Elizabeth’s charms during his visit to Hertfordshire, but when he learns of her imminent ruin, he decides he must propose to save her from disaster.  However, Elizabeth is reluctant to tarnish Darcy’s name by association…and the viscount still wants her…

Can Darcy save his honor while also marrying the woman he loves?

I hope you enjoy it!

Where is the Justice in Austen?

This is a recent blog of mine published on Austen Authors.  Enjoy!  I’d love to hear your opinions as well.

wickham-wedding

Readers often comment on the fact that in Pride and Prejudice there is no comeuppance or cosmic justice for the “bad” characters.  Although Wickham is shackled to Lydia and is forced into a new job, he gets off very easily for someone who has behaved so despicably.  Other characters who are deeply flawed end up no worse by the end of the book.  Collins will still inherit Longbourn, and he gets a wife who is far better than he deserves.  Miss Bingley and Lady Catherine continue on their merry ways, protected by their wealth and status.

Indeed, one of the fun things about Jane Austen Fan Fiction is that we can imagine some kind of justice for these characters in the form of imprisonment, death, or simple humiliation.   They are so flawed that their comeuppance can serve as a great source of humor as well as providing the satisfaction of having the wicked punished.  I have written such scenes; they are great fun and very emotionally satisfying.

Yet, even when I write them, I am aware that in some ways such scenes are not in keeping with Austen’s original intent.  She clearly intends that the bad/flawed characters should not suffer an evil end.  It would be easy enough for her to serve up some kind of cosmic justice to them.  However, it is enough for her that good characters have loving marriages and find secure places for themselves.  This is true in all her novels.  Fanny Dashwood gets to live off her ill-gotten gains.  Willoughby gets lots of money.  Lucy Stone gets the rich guy.  There is no justice meted out to Fanny Price’s relatives or Anne Elliott’s.

In some ways it is unsatisfying.  Don’t you want someone to take Lady Catherine down a peg?  Or tell Collins what a fool he is?  But in other ways, it feels exactly right.  It certainly makes Austen’s stories more true to life.  Haven’t you ever met someone who doesn’t deserve the good fortune they enjoy?  We struggle to earn a living while someone who is shallow or downright nasty glides along on inherited wealth—or is just in the right place at the right time.  Or you meet a couple where you think, “he/she doesn’t deserve a spouse like that.”  I believe, one of the reasons we don’t mind the absence of the kind of emotionally satisfying closure you get with other books is because it does feel familiar to us.

They also feel true to us in the way that the flawed characters cause trouble for the “good” ones.   Some of her characters do scheme and deceive for the sake of their own ends.  But in general, the wrongs they cause are a result of carelessness.  Wickham ruins Lydia’s reputation because he’s fleeing creditors and wants some company on the road, not because of some evil master plot.  And doesn’t that feel true to life?  Haven’t you had a friend who was in a bad relationship with a guy who was just careless of her feelings—without any evil intent?   They can cause just as much, if not more, damage as someone who actually intends harm.

Certainly characters like Lady Catherine or Collins or Miss Bingley or even Mrs. Bennet don’t rise to the Lord Voldemort—or even the Snidely Whiplash— level.  Their biggest flaws tend to be excessive self-regard and lack of sympathy for others.  Again, the wrongs they cause are mostly through carelessness (or in Collins’s case, excessive stupidity).  Doesn’t that feel familiar?  How often do friends and family cause deep wounds without intending to?  You experience the pain while also understanding that it stems from the other person’s own flaws rather than malice.  Austen’s characters remind us of people we know, albeit often exaggerated versions.

Ultimately, what sets the “good” characters apart from the “bad” ones is greater self-awareness—which is its own reward.  All of Austen’s heroines don’t end up wealthy, although they all have secure homes.  But they all benefit from an understanding of themselves, sympathy for those around them, and awareness of their own flaws.  In fact, becoming aware of one’s flaws is part of the plot of many of Austen’s books.  The reward for that journey of self-exploration is the ability to form a truly loving relationship with another person.  And that, Austen demonstrates, is what the flawed characters miss out on.

 

Giveaways of A Very Darcy Christmas!

I’m lucky enough to be a guest at three different blogs which are offering excerpts and giveaways of A Very Darcy Christmas.  Check it out!

http://calicocritic.blogspot.com/2016/12/book-excerpt-and-giveaway-very-darcy.html

https://moreagreeablyengaged.blogspot.com/2016/12/available-at-amazon-happy-holidays-to.html?showComment=1482336973248#c3909149365579615725

http://babblingsofabookworm.blogspot.co.uk/2016/12/a-very-darcy-christmas-by-victoria.html

Giveaway and 4.5 Star Review

There is a Giveaway and a lovely 4.5 Star Review for A Very Darcy Christmas at From Pemberley to Milton.
Rita writes, “This is a very entertaining book full of laughter and holiday spirit but it can be read at any other time of the year. It is funny, romantic and up to the standards Mrs. Kincaid already got us used to. She marvels at adding humor to her stories and yet keeping true to Jane Austen’s characters, and A Very Darcy Christmas is vivid proof of her proficiency in this type of stories.”  Thank you, Rita!

https://frompemberleytomilton.wordpress.com/2016/12/10/a-very-darcy-christmas-review-giveaway/

Five Star Review for Chaos Comes to Longbourn!

Wow!  Awesome five-star review from Margie’s Must Reads for Chaos Comes to Longbourn!  Margie writes:

With four couples perfectly matched with their absolute opposite, made this book very funny and utmost engaging.  I think every single character was true to form and written so wonderfully well! I could not stop reading!  I could not put this book down!”

Chaos Comes to Longbourn by Victoria Kincaid